Anthropology

The Boxing Culture in Oxnard California; and Why Boxers Fight at all?

    Author Name(s) Antonio Sepulveda Faculty Advisor(s) Dr. Jaime Matera Abstract The History of the La Colonia Boxing gym in Oxnard California and subsequently the boxing subculture that developed from it is one of an immigrant community coming together. In order to keep their youth from delinquent behavior, the help of dedicated citizens who spent their free time teaching boxing skills but most importantly mentoring the Oxnard youth participating in the… Read More »The Boxing Culture in Oxnard California; and Why Boxers Fight at all?

    The Age of Information and the Power of Being Self-Informed

    Author Name(s) Corrina Jacobitz Faculty Advisor(s) Dr. Jaime Matera Abstract The spread of misinformation that breeds mistrust and disbelief in science has led to a variety of issues relating to health, the general understanding of the natural world, and technological advancement across the globe. This has led to beliefs and efforts such as the anti-vaccine movement, the belief the earth is flat, and various other misinformation and conspiracy theories. While… Read More »The Age of Information and the Power of Being Self-Informed

    Sacrifice in Sports: The Ancient Maya Ballgame

    Author Name(s) Aria James Faculty Advisor(s) Jaime Matera Abstract The Ancient Maya ruled over the lands of Central America from 3000 BC to AD 1500. Known best for their towering temples in the jungle, the Maya were also known for their famous game, simply called the ballgame, which is credited as one of the first ever recorded uses of rubber. The archaeological record has found evidence to support that the… Read More »Sacrifice in Sports: The Ancient Maya Ballgame

    A Look Beyond the Coffee Cup: The Culture of Latin American Coffee Farmers in the Era of Climate Change

    Author Name(s) Lydia Rios Faculty Advisor(s) Dr. Jaime Matera Abstract Climate change is already here. Increased intensity and severity of natural disasters, rising temperatures, colder winters, and longer-lasting droughts are all influenced by climate change. These effects can be felt throughout the world and these impacts are particularly devastating to agricultural production and the livelihoods linked to it. This research project focuses on how Latin American coffee farmers, their agricultural… Read More »A Look Beyond the Coffee Cup: The Culture of Latin American Coffee Farmers in the Era of Climate Change

    Minds in Materials: Revealing Cognition Through the Archaeological Analysis of Acheulean Handaxes

    Author Name(s) Josh DesLaurier Faculty Advisor(s) Jaime Matera, Colleen Delaney Abstract This research examines how Acheulian handaxe morphology may be used to infer the cognitive abilities of ancient hominin species. These handaxes are often classified as a single archaeological type despite showing extensive morphological variation across their 1.6-million-year history that spans three continents. Being considered a single type has major implications for the cognition of their creators, as explored and… Read More »Minds in Materials: Revealing Cognition Through the Archaeological Analysis of Acheulean Handaxes

    Analysis of Fieldworkers and Work in Oxnard, California: Effects of Policy and Climate Change

    Author Name(s) Marnol Arevalos Faculty Advisor(s) Jaime Matera Abstract This work looks at how immigration policy and climate change affect the work environment for fieldworkers and their work. The hypothesis of this work is that immigration policy and climate change culminate in a series of disadvantages and advantages, but their overall outcome will generate an adverse work environment that will dissuade future immigrants from taking agriculture as an occupation. Therefore,… Read More »Analysis of Fieldworkers and Work in Oxnard, California: Effects of Policy and Climate Change

    Denizens of Normal: A Literary Review of Perspectives on Midwestern Farming Culture

    Author Name(s) Jonathan Housh Faculty Advisor(s) Dr. Jaime Matera Abstract The title of my Capstone presentation is “Denizens of Normal: Perspectives on Midwestern Farming Culture”. It is an overview of where the Midwestern United States is, both in its topography and its culture, and from that moving into an anthropological overview on the subject of Midwestern farming culture. The Capstone presentation will also detail how the population of the rural… Read More »Denizens of Normal: A Literary Review of Perspectives on Midwestern Farming Culture

    Campus Fever: Managing School and Fear of COVID-19

      Author Name(s) James Tobin Faculty Advisor(s) Dr. Jaime Matera Abstract  This original research evaluates student stress response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, specifically focusing on how students maintain positive mental health in the face of this crisis, all while continuing their education. My research methodology focuses on surveys offered to CSU Channel Islands students, and all responses are voluntary. Students may choose which response is appropriate. The survey is also… Read More »Campus Fever: Managing School and Fear of COVID-19

      A View into the Vampire Community: Sanguinarians, Spirituality and Psychic Vampirism

      Author Name(s) Chloe McCullen Faculty Advisor(s) Jaime Matera Abstract The folkloric vampire has been present in myriad cultures throughout history, with roots in Africa, Asia, North and South America, India, Eastern and Western Europe. This widespread myth has existed throughout the centuries to tackle the life versus death dichotomy and personify the liminal space between. Although extensive work has been done to define who or what a vampire is, scant research… Read More »A View into the Vampire Community: Sanguinarians, Spirituality and Psychic Vampirism